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  • Andrew Robl Takes Down Aussie Millions $100k Event

    Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 by Ryan

The Aussie Millions feature some of the biggest tournaments in the game in terms of their buy-in’s, and the story that we are going to talk about here today is going to be about the $100k Aussie Millions Challenge. The decision for many poker tournaments to have these high buy-in events is in large part due to the fact that it’s likely to draw in some of the biggest and best players in the game of poker. This Aussie Millions event constantly draws in big names, and when all was said and done at the $100k Challenge, the eventual winner was going to be sent home with an impressive prize that was worth A$1,000,000. The player who stood above the rest at the end of the day was well-known Andrew “good2cu” Robl. He held his own by beating a tough field to win the huge pay day.

The event actually only drew in 21 total players due to the huge buy-in, but there were 22 buy-in’s at the end of the day because a player decided to re-buy into the event after being knocked out early. If you want to hear a story about destiny, the player who actually rebought into the tournament was the eventual winner in Robl. The total prize pool at the end of the re-buy period ended up being A$2,167,000. This meant that four players were going to get paid out into the cash, which made Robl’s decision to re-buy even riskier.

The final table of the event featured seven players and it started up this Monday. The final table was supposed to feature eight players, but just before getting to the final table action Igor Kurganov knocked out two players on one hand in Winfred Yu and Chris Lee. This was the final hand of the opening day, and it saw Kurganov jump all the way up to second place in chips with 563,000 because of the knockout. Going into the final table the chip leader was Masa Kagawa, who was holding 695,000. Third place going into the final day in chips was Dan Shak with 435,000, then Tobias Reinkemeier with 160,000 in fourth, Vanessa Selbst in 5th with 136,000, and then was Robl with 129,000 and Niklas Heinecker with 85,000.

Obviously from looking at these chip stacks, the bottom four players all had quite a bit of work to do to be able to get into the cash, and even more if he wanted to make a profit on that re-buy. He ended up building up his stack slowly, and was able to get a nice double up through Tobias Reinkemeier. He ended up losing a good chunk of chips after that before doubling again through Kagawa to get just over 200k in chips.

He actually got his huge double though when he got it all-in with A-Q off against the pocket Kings of Kurganov. It didn’t look good at first but when he hit an Ace on the flop everything changed. His pair of Aces held and he was able to get his chip stack up to 544,000. He then knocked out Dan Shake in 4th place after that (our first player in the money) to get up to 850k, and that left him only 90k behind Kurganov for the chip lead. It was right before a break at that point that he got a nice pot from Kurganov and gained the chip lead sitting with 1.1 million at that point.

He ended up eliminating Kagawa later on when he turned a straight with J-10 against the K-10 of Kagawa. This set us up for some heads up action between Robl and Kuganov. Robl had a huge chip lead of 1.754 million chips to 446k chips. Kurganov actually made a good comeback though and was down only 350k at one point during the match. On the final hand we saw a board of 9c-4c-2h-3d and Robl bet out 60k, which led to a raise to 190k from Kurganov, and then an all-in from Robl. Kurganov called showing 4d-3s for two pair, but Robl had As-5c for the straight, and Kurganov was not able to hit a boat on the river. Kurganov went home in second place with a pay day of A$610,000.

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