1. Home>
  2. Poker News>
  3. PartyPoker Raises Withdrawal Fees Through Two E-Wallets
  • PartyPoker Raises Withdrawal Fees Through Two E-Wallets

    Friday, August 23rd, 2013 by Ryan

I feel like we are just in the process of going back and forth between the good and bad news here about online poker and live poker alike. While Full Tilt Poker players in the United States who had money tied up online finally look like they are going to get their money back before crazy long, things have gone south on a few of the different online poker sites. Whether it’s slow withdrawal speeds or games such changing on the sites, we can’t seem to get good news from anyone but the big online poker sites. The most recent news comes from one of the most well-known poker sites out there, PartyPoker. PartyPoker pulled the wool over the eyes of their players without even giving them a real heads up that they were doing so.

The change you ask? Well, they decided to up the fees that you are going to have to pay in order to withdraw from two of the most popular sites that players use. These two sites are Neteller and Skrill (Moneybookers), and as previously mentioned, they didn’t even send out any type of email to the players to let them know that the change was happening. This news came just a few weeks after we had great news come out from PartyPoker, and it was news that received a very warm welcome. The news was that they had a new software client that was going to be released in the near future.

While the software update hadn’t happened at the time that the changes were made to Neteller and Skrill, players did notice that the fees were increased. Now the players are going to have to pay $4 to cash out money from their PartyPoker account with either company, and they are also going to have a three percent fee that has no cap attached to it. This means that the fee could be as much as the maximum withdrawal, and that could obviously be some serious money.

The flat fee change obviously isn’t what players are up in arms about, but it’s the fact that if you make a massive payout that you are going to be paying a huge, huge fee as well. It basically means that PartyPoker is making a ton of extra cash on top of what they already make. The poker room does get charged by the e-wallet themselves to do any types of withdrawals, but it’s still shocking that it can end up being this much money. Basically PartyPoker is using these sites as a way to bring in some additional profit.

A poster on the Two Plus Two forum put it best when he said that the 3% with no cap is “just theft”, and that it’s obvious that it doesn’t cost “$300 to do a 10k skrill withdrawal.” Basically it comes down to the fact that there are a ton of ways that this could have been done that players would have been upset about, but that this increase is something that players simply may not be able to stomach at the end of the day.

Obviously there are a ton of different withdrawal methods through PartyPoker, but Neteller and Skrill are considered two of the most convenient and fast options for the players. If you do a mailed check for the $5 fee, it could end up taking weeks to get to you, and then to get into your bank account. There is the “Fast Bank” transfers that PartyPoker offers that don’t have a fee, but you can do those transfers only in the United States Dollar, Euros, or the British Pound.

If you want to look at one of PartyPoker’s biggest competitors, then you’ll see that PokerStars doesn’t charge anything for withdrawals through Neteller and Skrill, which is not a good thing for PartyPoker as you can imagine. The e-wallet themselves may charge a fee, but that is going to be the same fee no matter what site that the player is playing at. It’s going to be interesting to see what happens in the near future with this change, and how it affects the number of players on the site as well.

both

both

both

About Us | Contact Us | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Site Map

If you are interested in learning more about online poker, try searching on Yahoo, the Open Directory Project, or Bing.